Princess Doireann
 

Doireann Martin
Frenchpark, Co. Roscommon, Ireland.

Diffuse Intrinsic Pontin Glioma
Passed on 3rd February, 2017 - aged 6.

6 year old Doireann Martin, Cloonshanville, Frenchpark died on 3rd February 2017 (peacefully)  at her home  after a long illness, fought with great courage, to the intense grief of her parents Ivan and Tracy, sister Siofra, grandparents Kevin and Linda (Kiernan, Currian, Ballaghaderreen), Norah (Martin, Frenchpark), great-grandfather Paddy, plus uncles, aunts, cousins, relatives and a large circle of friends.

Ivan, Tracy and Siofra wish to extend heartfelt thanks to all who contributed to “A miracle for Doireann”. By doing so you made it possible for us to find and give Doireann a chance of treatment.


Doireann  was diagnosed with DIPG, (Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma) an inoperable brain tumour, in November 2015. Her family was devastated to discover that there is no survival rate for the condition, and that the average life expectancy  after diagnosis is just nine months. However, despite the terminal prognosis, parents Ivan and Tracy, from Frenchpark, Co Roscommon, launched an incredible €150,000 (£130,000) ‘Miracle for Doireann’ Go Fund Me campaign to probe new groundbreaking treatment possibilities. More than €66,000 was raised as family, friends, neighbours and even people who didn’t know the Martin family organised fundraising events and donated thousands of euros, reports the Irish Mirror

Ollie Towey who climbed Everest in support of Doireann

A family friend  said yesterday: “We’re just all so sad today. When it happens to someone so young it’s just so hard. The entire community pulled together to support the family in any way they could.” Ivan’s friend Ollie Towey, 34 from nearby Brusna, Ballaghaderreen, climbed 20,000ft to the Everest base camp in December to support the drive. Shortly afterwards, an anonymous person kindly donated €8,000. Tracy said: “The local community has been amazing, everyone has been so kind and everyone had a fundraising idea.”

Doireann undertook a course of radiation in December 2015, which shrank the tumour and reduced her symptoms, while three sessions of convection-enhanced drug delivery (CED) in Germany costing €45,000 also helped to stem the tumour’s growth.

However, Doireann’s symptoms started to return in July and by August last year, she was having trouble walking and had weakness in her left side.

A subsequent scan showed the tumour was progressing. Medical trials by Professor Steven Gill in Bristol, a consultant neurosurgeon, a world leader in CED, offered the Martins a glimmer of hope. They were told the hospital in Bristol was not taking any more patients, but on January 3 the Martins met CED specialists at Harley Street in London. Sadly, however, the couple was told Doireann was no longer suitable for treatment and that there was a rapid growth of the tumour last month.

Jo Bishop, a childhood cancer advocate for families fighting DIPG and a friend of the Martin family posted a tribute on Tracy’s social media page. She said: “Beautiful and precious Doireann has passed away. She captured all of our hearts as she fought DIPG. "Please keep her mum, dad and sister in your thoughts and prayers. We are so very sorry Ivan and Tracy Martin #PrincessDoireann.”

After hearing from doctors there was no survival rate for the illness, her parents Ivan and Tract started exploring new treatment options. The couple, from Frenchpark, Co Roscommon in Ireland, had heard about a medical trial run by Professor Steven Gill in Bristol Children's Hospital, and started fundraising towards it. The Bristol Post reports that Doireann's scan results were then sent to the trial in March 2016 to see if they would be suitable. The trial offered a way of getting chemotherapy to the tumour while bypassing the blood brain barrier, and would have cost the family £45,000. But according to the Bristol Post, in May last year, the family heard Bristol couldn't take the six-year-old for two to three months.

Mirror Online reported on Friday that despite her parents' best efforts, Doireann had died earlier that day, after her brave 14-month battle. A family friend said: "We're just all so sorry and sad today. When it happens to someone so young it's so hard. "The whole community and wider community pulled in together and did their best to support the family in any way we could." Doireann had undertaken a course of radiation in December 2015, which shrank the tumour and alleviated her symptoms. Then three sessions of pioneering convection-enhanced drug delivery (CED) in Germany costing €45,000 also helped to stall the tumour's growth, the Irish Mirror reported.

However, Doireann's symptoms started to return in July - and by August last year she was having trouble walking and had weakness in her left side. A subsequent scan showed the tumour was progressing.

The couple were told the hospital in Bristol was not taking any more patients, but on January 3 the Martins met CED specialists at Harley Street in London. Unfortunately however, the couple were told Doireann was no longer suitable for treatment and there was a rapid growth of the tumour last month.

Jo Bishop, a childhood cancer advocate for families fighting DIPG and a friend of the Martin family earlier posted a tribute on mum Tracy's social media page.

She said: "Beautiful and precious Doireann has passed away. She captured all of our hearts as she fought DIPG. "Please keep her mum, dad and sister in your thoughts and prayers. We are so very sorry Ivan and Tracy Martin #PrincessDoireann." Mirror Online has contacted University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust for comment.

From Roscommon People, March 24th, 2016


C & L Plex, Roscommon will play host to ‘The Singing Tree’ tomorrow (Friday, March 25th) in aid of ‘A Miracle for Doireann’. The charity was set up in order to raise funds for five-year-old Doireann Martin who was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour last November.

  Doireann was diagnosed with DIPG, an inoperable brain tumour with no survival rate.

Radiation is the only treatment available in Ireland. Doireann undertook a course of radiation in December which shrunk the tumour and alleviated her symptoms. She is now is great form and it is hoped that the radiation will keep the tumour stable for a long time. Doctors had given her a prognosis of a median survival time of nine months.

  Trials in CED technology, which was developed by Professor Gill in Bristol, infuses drugs into the brain by passing the blood brain barrier. This might be an option in the future, depending on scan results.

  There are also immunotherapy trials that are underway and it is hoped that one of these experimental trials will find a cure. Money raised will help ease the financial burden of the family and make it possible to enjoy the time they have with Doireann and to do fun things she would like to do.

  ‘The Singing Tree’ is a live puppet show aimed at children of all ages and promises to provide great entertainment while also raising funds for this very worthy cause.

  There will be performances at 5 pm and 7 pm in the conference room and C & L Plex and tickets are €3 per person.

  To get your tickets call 090 6665333 or drop into C & L Plex in the Centre Point Retail Park, Roscommon.